AS220 Seeking Industries Director and Industries Community Membership Manager

The AS220 Industries seeks to foster a diverse community of artists and makers by providing affordable access to resources and educational experiences in wide range of artistic disciplines including printmaking, digital fabrication, photography and media arts.

The Industries Director’s primary responsibility is to oversee programmatic offerings, ensuring they are are affordable and relevant to meeting demands of artists, members and students while maintaining and growing the financial sustainability of the Industries Program. The Industries Director manages staff, including the Community Membership Manager, Facilities Coordinator and Open Hardware Community Manager as direct reports.

The Community Membership Manager will be the person on the front line working most closely with members to foster community and implement systems and policies that create an accessible and welcoming space.  Day to day duties include assisting current members working in the space and signing up and orienting new members. The Community Membership Manager will coordinate member volunteer hours and oversee membership committees and Industries events. In the longer term, the Community Membership Manager will work to identify trends, track and analyse usage and gather input from members regarding interest. This position will work closely with the Facilities Coordinator and Industries Director to develop and implement policies and systems.

For more information and to apply, click here.

2018 Governors Island Art Fair

Deadline: May 28, 2018 Fee (USD): $45.00

Deadline: May 28, 2018 Fee (USD): $45.00 For more info visit www.4heads.org.

“The Art Fair for the 99%” -New York Times

See the GIAF video – https://youtu.be/IFdkkMht2rQ

Exhibit your art, your way, for free – in New York’s Largest Independent Exhibition: Governors Island Art Fair. At GIAF, each artist is free to self-curate a full room of their work in the historic buildings on this picturesque, almost surreal, former military base in the middle of New York Harbor.

Every weekend in September since 2008, 4heads has brought GIAF to Governors Island, just minutes from Manhattan and Brooklyn by scenic ferry ride. GIAF grants single exhibition rooms to individual artists from around the globe. Every year, more than 50,000 viewers visit this extensive exhibit housed in the landmark structures of New York’s favorite island get-away. GIAF is organized, produced, promoted, and installed entirely by working artists and volunteers. Participating exhibitors in GIAF are responsible for transporting, installing, and de-installing their own work. Artists are welcomed to attend the event as much as possible in order to communicate with art lovers and collectors, and to take advantage of the valuable contacts and relationships that form over the course of this series of weekends. Attendance is by no means required, but artists who accept the invitation to be on site, gain the most out of the experience and meet many collectors, curators and journalists.

GIAF is housed in and around the grand officers’ homes on Governors Island and is run with a hearty, DIY spirit and a strong sense of community. We ask our exhibitors to be resourceful, professional, self-sufficient, and well-versed in installing their own work – or finding someone who is. We are a stable, grass-roots, artist-run non-profit and we look forward to seeing you there.

Call For Art

Greetings!
We are collaborating again this year with Brown University’s medical school by merging art and medicine with our Call for Art about cerebrospinal fluid and connective tissue disorders. You can make a difference by creating a visual interpretation of these disorders that ultimately benefits both doctors and patients. Read more about this below.
We have another Modern Salon coming up. Karen Rand Anderson has invited us to visit her studio in which she’ll share her studio practices and start the conversation about the way we create our own art. Please RSVP to artleagueri@gmail.com if you would like to attend. Space is limited. Thanks for all your support!
CALL FOR ART
Entry Deadline: Monday, April 30
Atrium Gallery, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, 1 Capitol Hill, Providence RI
The original concept and vision was created by a Rhode Island neurosurgeon, Dr. Petra Klinge.  Her vision for the exhibition is to capture through artistic renderings the “essence” of a clinical disorder, specifically those associated with cerebrospinal fluid and connective tissue disorders.  Dr. Klinge reflects upon these artworks as part of her annual medical symposium held at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and utilizes them to assist physicians and scientists to both gain a better understanding of the patient experience and create empathy for the patient’s condition. READ MORE

RISD seeking Program Manager for Digital and Interactive Design Studies

Continuing Education at RISD is seeking a part-time Program Manager, Digital and Interactive Design Studies. This Program Manager is responsible for researching, planning, staffing, coordinating, monitoring, evaluating and implementing offerings in Digital and Interactive Studies. This includes certificate programs, courses, conferences, seminars and special events, in areas such as Animation; Interactive Design, Photography and Digital Foundations.

For more information and to apply, click here.

Artist Spotlight: Becci Davis

Roots United.

becciorange

Photo Credit: Danielle Klebes

Rebecca ‘Becci’ Davis, an interdisciplinary artist originally from Columbus, Georgia now residing in Wakefield, Rhode Island, has established herself as an artist who has created work she believes should be received universally, pieces that on some level could be understood by everyone. While attending Lesley University College of Art and Design in Cambridge, Massachusetts pursuing her MFA, she began thinking about her practices and goals she set in place, creating and talking about artwork that was very personal to her was a way to reach the masses. “It was something that happened very naturally, not on purpose…I was still making the same kind of work but I wanted to put more personal narratives in my work.”  I think it should go without saying, when an artist creates a body of work it’s developed with a personalized aspect coming from within, drawing you into their personal narrative to better understand their work and who they are as an individual artist.

As cosmic energies and stars would begin to align, around Thanksgiving 2015 Becci received a promotional email from Ancestry.com for a free trial to discover more of her familial heritage, ‘I thought to myself, oh this will be fun but I probably won’t find anything.’ Like many African-Americans who are descendants of slavery here in the United States, records of family history are usually few and far between, but with adamant research and “completely obsessing,” Becci stopped making her other work and began to focus more of the efforts on her family history. “As the days and weeks passed, I realized I can’t continue making the work I was making and I found myself thinking about it [family history] all the time because there was so much. And I thought what I was doing outside of my practice at the time was so much more rich and complex and it was more ME, it was like…not discovering myself because I’ve always known these stories but realizing that my story had value to someone other than me.”

In 2017, Becci created a video, “Isaiah’s Inventory (Fog Follows Rains)”, one of the pieces she submitted that resulted in the 2018 RISCA Fellowship in New Genres. This piece details the inventory and appraisement of the estate of Isaiah Parker from Harris County, Georgia. Isaiah Parker was the slave owner of Becci’s ancestors. This video was a depiction of how the value of life could be broken down to a simple dollar amount. Having value in one’s family history can come with great pride and reverence. However, as Becci recites the name, race, and monetary value of each slave on the Parker Plantation, it is a feeling of worthlessness. Keeping true to the times, as the video progresses, take notice of the objects used in this piece such as the fountain pen with black ink on cotton rag paper, the unwritten names of the slaves along with their prices is very telling of the erasure and disregard of human life that can be so easily purchased and then forgotten about like an inanimate object.

Going forward, Becci continued her work drawing on themes of American-Black culture, crafting ideas and choosing different mediums to get her narrative across in pieces like ‘Collard Archive of Modern History’, the process of creating ‘life-like’ collard greens by casting handmade paper into molds and using library catalog cards under the subject heading of ‘modern history’ as pulp. A staple vegetable used in soul-food/southern cuisine, collard greens have a cultural connection with Black Americans. Becci Davis has what she calls a complicated relationship with the food, and the greens have been the source of rich culture and significance to her work.  Through her art, Becci finds ways to bring forth both cultural histories and significance by dispelling the notion that Black History is separate from the American History narrative: “because Black history is American history – it’s our shared history, it’s not separate from US history. It needs to be one people, I think that the idea we have two separate histories, we are two separate people and worlds is a lie.” 

Collard Archive of Modern History

Collard Archive of Modern History

In addition to being the recipient of the 2018 RISCA Fellowship, Becci is also the 2018 Creative Fellow at the Providence Public Library, where her work centered around the exhibition program & series, Hair Brained.  This series collection and interactive performances, which is being held at the Providence Public Library from March 1st – June 30th, focused on hairstyles throughout history and the ways in which hair defines and reflects culture, self-identity, agency, and politics.  The interactive performance piece, ‘Beacon Beauty Shop’ created by Becci was “‘something that sort of honored the idea of beauty shop culture and African-American culture but also served as a bridge or way of access in to Black hair for people who didn’t understand.” Walking into a beauty salon is an experience that we’ve all had at some point in our lives, “this isn’t something that divides us, this is something that we have in common.” The real cross-cultural experience came from her salon menu options from a wash-n-wrap, press-n-curl, and a relaxer/perm where some of the “clients” weren’t familiar with some of the hair techniques. In the African-American community a perm and relaxer are one and the same, a process to permanently straighten/relax your roots to become very straight. “Culturally our process is different – although I grew up saying “perm”, I made sure to put it as “relaxer” because culturally there’s a difference. When white people think “perm”, its turning already straight hair to curly and when we say “perm” we are PERMANENTLY straightening the roots.”  The goal of this interactive piece was to demystify Black hair and Black beauty shop culture, the creation of ‘Beacon Beauty Shop’ was the first step in trying to make that happen. “I think people came in expecting me to play in their hair, which is fine but when they realized there is this moment that we shared together listening to other people’s stories was something I got a lot out of – I enjoyed that exchange.” 

WhoseNameWasWritInWaterFilmStill_BDavis

Rebecca ‘Becci’ Davis, an artist who honors personal experience, oral narratives and events from past, present and future. “Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.” – Thomas Merton

Call to Artists and Curators

The Jamestown Arts Center is accepting exhibition proposals for 2020!
The gallery is currently booked through December of 2019.  
The deadline for submissions for 2020
 is May 1, 2018.

Please email proposals to Exhibition Director Karen Conway at karen@jamestownartcenter.org

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Call to Artists & Curators

The gallery space at the Jamestown Arts Center has become one of the most exciting places to experience art and design in southern Rhode Island.  Because of its large size and high ceiling height, the space is unique and lends itself to a variety of exhibits.

If you are interested in showing your work or curating a show, you must submit a proposal to the exhibition committee.  We strongly urge you to visit the space first so that you understand its possibilities and limitations. We are also very interested in collaborating with other spaces and organizations, particularly outdoors in Jamestown.

The gallery is currently booked through December of 2019.  The deadline for submissions for 2020 is May 1, 2018.

Proposals should include the following:

  • A description of the exhibition, including its objective and why it should be shown at the Jamestown Arts Center.
  • Possible and best case time frames for the exhibition.  The usual duration of an exhibition is 4-6 weeks.
  • Artist’s or curator’s statement(s), and/or other support material, reviews, résumés, exhibition history etc.
  • A list of artists participating, if applicable.
  • Links to relevant website(s) if available.
  • A selection of high-quality digital images of the artwork to be shown, with titles, dimensions, and dates. Can be emailed or sent on cd.
  • Price range of the artwork, if it is for sale. Note: that the JAC will take a 35% commission if work is sold while at the arts center.
  • List of costs the JAC can expect, beyond reasonable gallery maintenance and opening expenses.
  • Description of educational programming that could be connected to this exhibit- artists’ or curators’ talks, workshops, films, classes, field trips etc.

    We are a multi-disciplinary facility:

    Please note the gallery space is also used for monthly film screenings, theatre productions, concerts, JAC talks, and other events. All sculpture and installations must be movable to accommodate other programming.